Seeing-as and Novelty Conference – University of York

I’m really looking forward to this conference, which will be held at the University of York, on Monday 24th September 2012.

Seeing-as is a phenomenon of deep importance for several major areas of academic philosophy. It is of clear relevance to central issues concerning aesthetics, philosophy of language, philosophy of perception, and epistemology. As well as figuring in Wittgenstein’s work in particular – and analytic philosophy more generally – seeing-as is of central importance to phenomenological philosophy following in the traditions inaugurated by figures such as Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty.

The purpose of this conference is to explore how we should understand the relationship between our capacity for seeing-as, the determination of new concepts, and our capacity for using and extending the use of concepts in hitherto novel situations.

The speakers will be:

Michael Beaney (York)
Bill Childs (Oxford)
Robert Clark (York)
Naomi Eilan (Warwick)
Marie McGinn (UEA)
Komarine Romdenh-Romluc (Nottingham)
Rachael Wiseman (York)

Registration: £30 (waged), £15 (student)

**Registration in advance is not necessary, but preferred.**

Graduate Respondents:

Graduate students are invited to apply to respond to papers given by the above speakers. Please send a statement (of no more than a page) detailing your area of research and your interest in this conference to seeing[dot]as[dot]and[dot]novelty[at]gmail.com. In addition, there are a number of other bursaries available for graduate attendees which will primarily be awarded to unsuccessful applicants to be a respondent.

**The deadline for applications to be a respondent is July 8th 2012**

If you have any questions at all, or wish to register, please contact the organisers at seeing[dot]as[dot]and[dot]novelty[at]gmail.com

The conference has made possible by the kind support of The Mind Association, The Aristotelian Society, and The Analysis Trust.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Me-in-the-world

Comments are closed.